About Freerolls

Most people outside of the gambling community don't know the first thing about freerolls. They are, in essence, poker tournaments that are free to enter while still offering a cash or cash-like prize. The players don't have to put down any money to enter, which makes them a great medium for practicing and perfecting poker skills. There is no real risk, but there is the definite chance for reward.

Despite the fact that free normally sounds too good to be true, that's not the case about freerolls although some do have small restrictions. Some may award money for online poker games instead of cash; others may have you playing for some clothing or equipment. Some may be limited to new players, where others can be qualified for simply for following a star on some form of social media.

Most freeroll tournaments are going to offer cash, usually in the amount of $1,000 or $2,000, to entice new players to join their websites. Some only offer a small amount of cash; this is only a few bucks as an incentive, but there have been some known to offer upwards of $1 million as a prize. While joining every freeroll that crosses your path may be tempting, it can pay to wait for the right one to come to you.

Qualifying for these games is simple; many times it is as simple as signing up for an online poker room. Many offer daily, weekly, and monthly tournaments for members, new players, or simply for people who have made a deposit recently. Never signed up for one? Maybe you follow a poker page on Facebook or enter a related contest. These are also good places to have freerolls explained if the rules are different than normal.

For anyone who is looking to hone their skills or just to spend some time playing without any real risk, these risk-free games can be ideal. t is easier to test your skills and strategies against a live person than it is against some online AI, and if there's the opportunity to win some cash, it gets even better! PokerListings offers a large amount of exclusive options and has paid out over $6 million since 2005.